Category: Featured

April President’s Letter: Jazz Appreciation Month 2022

The experience was yet another confirmation of the promise of our soon-to-be-launched Passages program. Passages will connect musicians across generations using the jam session medium as a foundation for mentorship, storytelling, and transference of cultural knowledge. When youthful energy meets seasoned experience, everyone gets lifted.

Lovett Hines Wins Jazz Journalists Association Award

Other regional winners include bassist, composer, and educator Ed Hrybyk of Baltimore, Massachusetts-based Terri Lyne Carrington, a drummer, composer, and educator who has been a keynote speaker at the Jazz Philadelphia Summit; and Sara Donnely from Washington, D.C., a longtime jazz advocate who administers programs that support jazz musicians at South Arts. 

Philadelphia’s Rising Women in Jazz

The city of Philadelphia honors the legacy and tradition of jazz music, by providing exceptional educational resources that continue to contribute to the profound jazz community that has been established here.Temple University and University of the Arts, two of Philadelphia's premier institutions of higher learning, have exceptional jazz programs where students can hone in on their craft...

March President’s Letter: Get Jazzed Day 2022

The collaboration between the organizations for Get JazzEd Day was fluid and inventive, much like jazz itself. And just like the music, which serves the purpose of touching the lives of the listeners, our partnerships are designed to impact the lives of musicians, educators, students—everyone in our creative community...

Key of She Jazz March 2022 Recap

Up next, Key of She has been working to improve their website and expand their already extensive resources list (which already includes reading lists, film lists, listening recommendations, and a comprehensive list of over 600 women in jazz)...

A Note about Women’s History Month 

"I experience first hand the lack of gender representation in academic settings. I also see how important it is to have a supportive community – not only of other girls and young women in jazz, but peers, teachers, and others who see the importance of the mission."

Black Musicians Unite

Musicians’ Protective Union Local 274, American Federation of Musicians was chartered on January 2, 1935 by Black musicians. Local 274 was one of more than fifty Black musicians’ unions established in the American Federation of Musicians. The first Black musicians’ union Local 208 was established in Chicago in 1902. In Philadelphia, Frank Thurman "Frankie" Fairfax, orchestra leader, composer and trumpeter, became a key figure in the movement to organize a musicians' union...

The Explosion of Philadelphia Jazz Clubs

By the 1920's, Black urban workers sought opportunities in the music industry as an alternative to high unemployment which plagued their community. With the continuation of Black migrations from the South to the North, there was a rise in African-American urban populations. These increases resulted in a demand for Black entertainment, which meant an increase in jobs in the music field...

Immanuel Wilkins Releases New Record, “The 7th Hand” 

Philadelphia’s own Immanuel Wilkins recently released his new record “The 7th Hand,” on Blue Note Records on January 28, 2022. Wilkins’ record displays a fabulous quartet including musicians Micah Thomas on piano, Daryl Johns on bass, and Kweku Sumbry on drums. 

Mass Unemployment, the Great Migration, and the Rise of Big Bands

By the 1920's, Black urban workers sought opportunities in the music industry as an alternative to high unemployment which plagued their community. With the continuation of Black migrations from the South to the North, there was a rise in African-American urban populations. These increases resulted in a demand for Black entertainment, which meant an increase in jobs in the music field...

The Social Stigma of the “Musician” Class

The city of Philadelphia, known as a cradle of jazz, has a rich and significant jazz history that goes back much further than most people realize. In the order to understand the emergence of jazz in the City of Philadelphia one must begin in the nineteenth century and trace black musical organization into the early twentieth century...