Author: Jazz Philadelphia Admin

Coltrane Watch:

Interventions surrounding the Coltrane House over the last decade—from nearly all quarters of the Philadelphia jazz community—prove how anguished advocates have been over the condition and the future of the property.

Keep Going, and It Will Happen

This is a time-honored tradition of how the art of jazz is transferred from one generation to the next. The elder gives from a position of experience and honesty. The younger receives with a spirit of openness and humility. This process is essential to preserving the integrity and quality of the music while allowing space for it to grow and evolve.

A Shot in the Arm for the Arts

The line of people snaked around the block looked like it wasn’t going to ever move. Yet there was very little grumbling from the participants in spite of the frigid morning air. Everyone wanted to be here. This wasn’t a queue for a Black Friday sale on televisions or to buy tickets to the first of the live shows we can’t wait to see.

Coltrane Watch

There have been questions from some quarters about why there is such renewed interest in the Coltrane House, which can be roughly summarized with, “Where was the jazz community all the time the historic home was slowly deteriorating?”

Coltrane Watch

Questions surrounding how any person or business gets a demolition permit for a building are rampant in the jazz community, especially when it concerns the John Coltrane House at 1511 North 33rd Street, or in this case, the house at 1509 North 33rd Street, which is attached to the historic home site. The owners of 1509 have applied for, but not yet received, a demolition permit.

Kendrah Butler-Waters

Kendrah Butler-Waters' affinity for Philadelphia's historic musical roots has served as the muse for her creative output as a skilled and imaginative pianist, composer, violinist, and vocalist.

Let Freedom Ring

When my youngest daughter was in middle school, I discovered that Black History Month was a tricky proposition. Her sixth-grade teacher’s announcement of the February events was met by a chorus of mostly-white classmates who collectively groaned, “Do we have to talk about slavery again?”

Children of Adam Band utilizes outdoor rehearsal space

After starting 2019 with a performance tour at George Mason University during Valentines Day and preparing for their upcoming international spring festival, the COVID-19 pandemic brought the Children of Adam Band’s 14-personnel tour schedule to a screeching halt on March 11, 2019.